Photojournalism, Advocacy & Eurocentrism: An Introduction Or A Post With 17,000 Words Is Mercifully Broken Up Into Smaller Pieces

…Since 1945, the decolonization of Asia and Africa, plus the sharply accentuated political consciousness of the non-European world everywhere, has affected the world of knowledge just as much as it has affected the politics of the world-system. One major such difference, today and indeed for some thirty years now at least, is that the “Eurocentrism” of social science has been under attack, severe attack. The attack is of course fundamentally justified, and there is no question that, if social science is to make any progress in the twenty-first century, it must overcome the Eurocentric heritage which has distorted its analyses and its capacity to deal with the problems of the contemporary world.

(I Wallerstein, Eurocentrism and its Avatars: The Dilemmas of Social Science New Left Review, Issue 226, November-December 1997

Around the colonized there has grown a whole vocabulary of phrases, each in its own way reinforcing the dreadful secondariness of people who, in V.S. Naipaul’s derisive characterization, are condemned only to use a telephone, never to invent it. Thus the status of colonized people has been fixed in zones of dependency and peripherality, stigmatized in the designation of underdeveloped, less-developed, developing states, ruled by a superior, developed, or metropolitan colonized who was theoretically posited as a categorically antithetical overlord.…Thus to be one of the colonized is potentially to be a great many different, but inferior, things, in many different places, at many different times.

Edward Said, ‘Representing The Colonized: Anthropology’s Interlocutors’, Reflections On Exile: And Other Essays, Page 294

The characters in the game would be based on people in the field: doctors, nurses, aid workers, journalists, photographers, child soldiers. NGOs would be involved in the game’s design so that the user is educated as well as entertained. These organizations could also benefit from revenues generated by the players, which could aid real world projects in specific places.

The photojournalist will hopefully be the link between the aid/NGO world and the people who are impacted by the conflict. They will be able to go behind rebel lines to see the use of child soldiers and to report on the violence, displacement, and desperate health situation. In this way, the photojournalist will be the eyes for the game “world.”

(The photojournalist Marcus Bleasdale, talking about his new video game venture Zero Hour: Congo, described as ‘…an immersive game based on the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo’)

Marcus Bleasdale is perhaps amongst the world’s most well known photojournalists. His near twelve year work on the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has won him international recognition, awards from most all photojournalism competition of note and various foundation grants. A member of the famous VII photo agency, he represents for many, the finest in the tradition of concerned photography. Marcus has dedicated the better part of his career to the conflict in the DRC, and has extended his work with an extensive set of engagements with both human rights organizations, international media and international bodies such as the United Nations. As he describes it himself, his aim has been to make people:

…see the consequences of our actions and of our need to consume. This war [in the DRC] is all about natural resources, natural resources that no Congolese uses. If we did not demand Gold, Coltan, Cassiterite then this would not be happening. We must increasingly see the links between our behavior in the developed world and wars in the developing world and accept the responsibility we all have in creating the conflict and accept the responsibility we all have in trying to make it stop. As a photographer I feel I can supply the tools to the people who have the power to make that happen.

It was because of such a commitment that he was recently selected to participate in the Magnum Foundation / Open Society Institute’s ‘Photography Expanded: Rethinking Engagement And Impact’ conference. According to the official statement of the conference, it was designed to:

…explore how to use technology and new media to expand the reach of [a photojournalist’s] images in order to maximize their impact and help effect social change.

Marcus Bleasdale, in collaboration with the British digital games developer nDreams, is producing a video game called Zero Hour: Congo. His reasoning, offered in an interview on the Photography Expanded conference website, is that:

Grassroots users of electronic products (smart phones, tablets, laptops, cameras, and game consoles) are largely unaware that they are involved [in the DRC conflict because of their use of electronics equipment that relies on raw materials from the DRC]. Developing a game that could entertain and at the same time guide people to increased awareness seemed to be the right direction to follow. We increasingly see youth today not engaging in mainstream news. If they are not coming to traditional platforms for information, I figured I would bring mainstream news to them.

In the same interview, when asked how he intended to ‘…connect that audience to ongoing advocacy or conversations about what’s happening in DRC?’ Marcus replied:

The characters in the game would be based on people in the field: doctors, nurses, aid workers, journalists, photographers, child soldiers. NGOs would be involved in the game’s design so that the user is educated as well as entertained.

Further adding that the ‘character’ of the journalist / photojournalist will be to act as:

…the link between the aid/NGO world and the people who are impacted by the conflict. They will be able to go behind rebel lines to see the use of child soldiers and to report on the violence, displacement, and desperate health situation. In this way, the photojournalist will be the eyes for the game “world.” 

Photography Expanded wants to be at the cutting edge of photography, technology and advocacy, exploring ways in which new media and the creative possibilities offered by the medium can help photographers gain wider audiences, and more effective strategies for achieving change in society. And Marcus Bleasdale’s idea for a video game that educates a younger generation about the connection between their consumer habits and the forces that fuel the war appeared, was featured during the conference as an example of some of the most interesting thinking in this regard.

Suffice it to say, all this provoked a lot of questions and concerns, and gave rise to this rather long and detailed exploration of the assumptions and ideas that underpin the idea and how they fail to reflect the world that we today operate it. There were many problematic statements here and I think many of us may already know what is to follow. Regardless, this is a critique of a world view in general that seems to continue to influence how we work as photojournalists ie. how we frame our stories, how we see the world, and how we perceive our place in it. 

I believe that it is an important critique and though people may disagree with the specifics of my criticism I hope that they can at least understand the need to engage in it. The photojournalism industry – its editors, photographers, curators, critics and hangers-on, seem very reluctant to allow serious and important issues of method, structure, assumptions and intellectual frameworks to be discussed in open and honest exchange. There is an obsessive focus on technology, technical innovation and aesthetics of the digital darkroom, but a near complete silence about the fundamental intellectual and structural platforms informing it. I believe this silence comes from simply being unaware of the need to examine some of the social, cultural, and power assumptions that underpin Western photojournalism. As a photographer working from outside this self-affirming world, these assumptions are perhaps more obvious to me and the short-comings of the entrenched methods more visible.

This is a small attempt to provoke this conversation.

Let me begin by quickly pointing out that there are are a number of questionable idea behind a video game as advocacy approach. I want to dispense with a few that came immediately to mind because I will not be concentrating on addressing the, but merely listing them here for consideration. For example:

  • Whether a game based on a rather cartoonish world-view – doctors, nurses, aid workers, journalists, photographers, child soldiers, can be expected to transform real world behavior of a younger generation of European / Western technology product users who will clearly not be exposed to the real issues driving the conflict, nor the complexities of Congolese history, politics, colonial legacies and the myriads of ethnic, political and other conflicts that are key drivers of the conflict?

  • How a product that can only be used on the very technologies the photographer claims are fueling the conflict – coltan and other such minerals, expected to then argue for a reduction in the use of such technologies? What happens if the game is a runaway success, and the sales of game consoles, hand-held devices, and associated accessories goes through the roof? Pity the Congolese then!

  • Why we, despite there being absolutely no evidence of a causal link between video game playing and social behavioral change, believe that this is even something worth considering? On what basis is this even being attempted when it is not even clear that it has any ability to raise awareness? Violent video games are played by kids all over the world, and yet we do not believe that this reduces their opposition to war or violence.

  • How can we expect a virtual world experience that actually disconnects the users from the real world – a feature that may be one of the reasons why people love video games in the first place, to translate itself into a greater awareness of perhaps one of the most intractable conflicts in modern history?

  • Would a private corporation investing hundreds of thousands of dollars n the design, development, testing, production, and marketing of this game commit itself to the priorities of social change, or to the priorities of turning a profit? And what happens when there is a severe conflict of interest between those two ends?

These are some of the unanswered question and unverified assumptions behind this idea which on the surface appeared very cutting edge and innovative. I am sure that there are more, but this is what came to mind immediately. And even if I accept that all this would be effective – that people could learn by playing a video game, and change their consumerist behavior as a result, there were other, perhaps more serious, problems.

For what lies behind this entire idea, and the markets it was aimed at, was a deep Euro-centric prejudice about not only how to speak about the world, but whom to speak to.This model continues to influence how we as photographers and photojournalists go about attempting to change the pathologies we witness, and how we speak about the subjects we assume the right to speak for.

I spell out some of my concerns in more detail in the following sections as it is the main concern of this essay.

Western photojournalism remain deeply trapped in an Euro-centric worldview. This rather limited way of seeing and understanding the world not only limits the kinds of stories that are produced, but more seriously, cripple the photographer’s understanding of her role, her ability to affect social change, and the kinds of advocacy campaigns she engages in.

The first of these issues- the limited kinds of stories produced, and the rather limited issues and topics photojournalists tend to focus on, was addressed in at least two earlier posts – see Digressions On Photojournalism Or Why I Argue What I Argue and The Limits of Photojournalism And Things More Worthwhile.

In this post I want to address the second of the two concerns – the Euro-centric world view of Western photojournalists producing works about the world outside their Western markets, and some of the unspoken assumptions that underpin their attempts at social change and advocacy.

But what do I mean by an Euro-centric world view? Specifically, the set of assumptions that:

  • The European / Western actor in the field (whether a NGOs, aid organizations or individual) are the most meaningful if not the only interesting and effective actors, and that local activists, organizations, and other actors are simply marginal, if not completely irrelevant.

  • The attention and ‘awareness’ of the European / Western audience in the photographer’s markets is what really matters as far as genuine acts of advocacy and pressure for social change action is concerned

  • The Western journalist is a neutral ‘eye’ to the world, unaffected by bias of her history, political understanding, and the structure and priorities of the media industry she works within.

  • The world is ‘looked down’ from the heights of a civilized European cultural and political space, where the assumption of the right to intervene and act on the lives of ‘the other’ is a given.

Now, before people get all upset and start accusing me of reverse bigotry and what have you, let me clarify something before I continue. Euro-centricity is not about ethnicity, but about a world view. It does not refer to the white-man so to speak, but to a certain way of seeing. For example, there are many Bangladeshi, Indian and Pakistani photographers who are extremely Euro-centric in the way they document and produce their works – the assumptions about their society, culture, its history, agency and the actions required or even the issues identified reflect a deep affinity and absorption of ‘a distant’ eye. They have become accustomed – through education, life experiences, market sales possibilities and other influences, to seeing their own world through the eyes and agency of The West. So this is not about ethnicity, or being an indigenous photographer, but about a certain way of looking at the world, and understanding how it operates, that I wish to discuss. As an aside, I believe that one of the best archive of Pakistani photographs belongs to a German photographer who has spent the last 15 years working in the country.

This Euro-centricity carries within it a number of ideas that are hang-overs from an earlier world. But in an industry which remains very reluctant to build a culture of critical, and intellectual thought, the presumptions and prejudices continue to color so much of today’s photojournalism. It could be argued that it has only gotten worse in the post-9/11 world, where an entire host of orientalist and bigoted ideas about a large swath of humanity began to become mainstream journalistic, political and cultural currency. (For example, see some of my recent critiques of works features on Time Magazines and its LightBox photography blog site here, here and here). Rather than progress with the times, and arrive into a more inter-connected, articulate, and egalitarian world, photojournalists remain determined to ignore modernity and its developments and continue to document societies in way that echo works from twenty, or thirty years earlier.

Mainstream photojournalism appears to be immune to some of the radical changes that have affected so many other fields of human creativity and inquiry. I had argued in my post Digressions On Photojournalism Or Why I Argue What I Argue :

Photojournalism (photographers and photo editors) has been oddly immune to transformations that have affected other fields. The subaltern has spoken, in a language of his/her own, and can finally be heard. An entire literature has broken through from world’s previously silenced. New histories are being revealed, and counter narratives to debilitating colonial histories being offered. The voice of the [previously] marginalized now reside alongside those once considered the ‘canon’ and do so by integration and expanding out understanding of our own pluralist heritage and history. In American alone the voices of women, African Americans, the indigenous and so many others can no longer be ignored and have enhanced and illuminated our understanding of ourselves and the experiences of history.

The changes that have taken place in so many other fields seem largely absent from the craft of mainstream photojournalism which still remains largely about silencing the other, and reconstructing their worlds and lives as defined by pathos, victim hood and hopelessness. Photographers still transgress into the worlds ‘other’ with an impunity and indifference that can leave one shocked if not outright dismayed. They return with stories right out the works of Joseph Conrad, revealing the ‘darkest’ Africa, the direst of Asiatic ‘despotisms’. And unlike other fields – literature, arts, politics, there seem to be few … counter voices that challenge these simplistic representations. And if they are, then they fail to make it to the pages of our finest magazines or the podium of our finest awards.

Some clarifications are in order. I realize that these questions will provoke people, and I will do my best to be specific in order to avoid confusion and encourage an engagement with this essay rather than a rejection and simply refutation:

First, I will be using the terms ‘Europe’ and ‘Western’ not as spatial categories, but more as a set of cultural, historical and political assumptions. The term ‘Western’ refers to Europe and North America. My use of the term ‘photojournalist’ refers to documentary photographers, news photographers and other photographers working on issues of social and human concern.

Second, this is not in defense of some alternative -centrism. I am not advocating the supplanting of an Euro-centric world view with an Afrocentric or Islamocentric or some other equally invalid, ethnically particularist perspective.

Third: This is also not a criticism of individual European / Western photographers, but a criticism of a series of prejudices, assumptions and perspectives that inform the work of photographers from across the globe. European and American photojournalists continue to dominate the industry in terms of creativity, courage, determination, ambition and financial and publishing support. It is about a way of seeing and understanding the world that remains deeply colored by some specific attitudes, presumptions and imaginations. There is no doubt that Western photojournalist remain at the peak of the craft (though an argument can be made that the Bangladeshis have really raised the bar, but that is a different post!) , and that their works, perspectives and methods influence photographers around the globe.

No one can deny that Western photojournalists are frequently emulated. It is the well-justified global influence of the European / Western photojournalist that compels me to speak about their work, and the ideas that inform and define it because they are now seriously crippling a more nuanced, intelligent and creative engagement with societies that have previously been dependent, dispossessed and distanced by narratives about their history, agency and capacity.

This post – broken up into five parts – will focus on these key areas:

  1. Part 1: There Is No Other But Us: I begin by looking at how the very people photojournalists claim to be speaking on behalf of are missing from their works and appear only as victims. There is a long legacy for such erasures, and I attempt to highlight this.

  2. Part 2: Angel Of Mercy, Have Mercy! Here I discuss the long held assumption that NGOs, international aid and humanitarian organizations are neutral, apolitical and doers only of good. Their influence – political and other, within the regions they work is now coming under critical scrutiny and criticism and this has yet to make it to the photojournalism world.

  3. Part 3: A World Really Small: Here I examine at how the European / Western consumer / audience becomes the principal focus of all advocacy appeals, and how issues that would matter to this market become the goal of advocacy. This has disastrous consequences for the people photojournalists are trying to help, but also reduces all advocacy to nice sound bites, and charity give aways, exacerbating the situation on the ground and avoiding the harder, more complicated work required.

  4. Part 4: Witness To The World: In this piece I look at the continued depiction of the photojournalist as ‘eyes to the world’ and carrying about her work without political, economic and cultural baggage. It questions the assumption that journalism is a neutral, eye-witness only craft, and tries to highlight how journalists are complicit in power relationships and political hierarchies.

  5. Part 5: The Burden Of Proof: Here I summarize my previous pieces and discuss the constant pressure photojournalism feels to justify its existence by having to indulge in advocacy, and socially conscious actions.

Part 1 will follow in a few days. In the mean time I hope that this introduction is provocative enough to get us to start to think about some of these issues.

 

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Still Speaking For The Others, But At Least Doing It Honestly

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I remember Ben Ehrenreich. He was the writer who wrote perhaps one of the best pieces about the Palestinian resistance struggle in the town of Bilin in the West Bank against Israel’s hideous and inhumane apartheid wall. He was also the guy I quoted in a piece I wrote on Western photojournalism’s obsessive Eurocentricism when it comes to reporting on Brown and Black societies. It was in the context of speaking about the need for ‘White’ interlocutors that I quoted Ehrenreich, and wrote:

“The West’s desperation for ‘white’ interlocutors and the silence of the other – was very strongly bought to the fore by Ben Ehrenreich of The New York Times, the writer of a powerful and rather unusual for the magazine, piece of reportage on the Palestinian resistance to Israeli military rule and occupation in the West Bank. The article, This Is Where The Third Intifada Will Start was a powerful piece and rare in the voices of the Palestinians it allowed to come through. In an interview he gave afterwards he was asked a very pertinent and powerful question which touched on this very issue – the constant representation of the other by an European – and his response was powerful and clear. The question that was posed to him was this:

Let’s talk about the Jewish narrator. In 2006 the Times published a very important essay by Tony Judt in support of Walt and Mearsheimer’s LRB piece on the Israel lobby, and Judt later said that they asked him to insert in there, I’m Jewish. Judt told the story because he knew that Jews were privileged, and that the Times needed to send this signal to its readers. As the NYRB does by publishing David Shulman when it’s critical of Israel, as the New Yorker does when David Remnick is the authority. As Mondoweiss does by stating, we’re a progressive Jewish site at root. As JVP does. It’s a racket, we’re all in on it, and my question is, When do Palestinians get to hold the microphone. Aren’t you and I to blame too? Because if they were holding the microphone, a basic human rights issue like the right to resist that is so core to your piece would have been noncontroversial many many years ago. As it is, Americans have to warm up to the idea, and a Jew has to bring them this news. Comment?

And Ehrenreich’s response was unequivocal and clear. He responded:

I’m glad you asked that question, and yeah, it’s super-problematic. It’s a specific instance of a bigger problem, that black and brown people’s stories can generally only be told in this society via the authority of a white narrator, that we–white people, in this case of Jewish ancestry–are tasked with the representation of black and brown and in this case Palestinian people, who in this dynamic are stuck in the passive role of being represented and are not allowed to interpret their own realities. So certainly we are complicit, and I don’t see any way out of that complicity except to use what privilege I have to tell stories that tear holes in the broader narratives which allow this arrangement to continue. And to do so with scrupulous attention to my own role in it, to the power differentials at play. (My emphasis)”

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Keep Your Eye On The Right Hand!

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European / Western wish for innocence, for purity of spirit, takes tens of millions of dollars to keep up. All sorts of bizarre, racist, programs have to be designed, and all sorts of institutions – scientific, civic, policing, political, social and cultural, are unleashed onto the unthinking citizenry, to seduce and numb them back to their place of quiet subservience and obedience. Here, the French yet again prove their determine war against truth and history. Just as before they spent tens of millions erasing their colonial legacy, their Algerian nightmare, their massacres on the streets, and their social and economic discrimination of a large percentage of their citizens, they are now aiming at any remembrance, or evidence, of the fact that France has been a nation at war in the Middle East, and West Africa, for over a decade now.

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A Rainbow Prohibition

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It is striking how in this entire piece about a lack of diversity in mainstream Western / European photojournalism, the idea ‘lack of representation’ is defined only as ethnic, nationalist, or gender. What is completely left out is politics. That is, the idea of a diversity of political views and perspectives that face, criticize, and dissent against the mainstream European / Western mainstream liberal discourse. And by not acknowledging the ‘manufacturing of consent’ element of mainstream Western media – a fact that has now been written about in countless books, articles and blog sites, it falls prey to simple, and yet again, ‘liberal’ ideas about what ‘diversity’ means and ought to be.

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You Talking To Me? Or Amnesia As A Choice

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This is one of the most beautifully produced pieces of Western propaganda I have seen in a long time. There is no doubt that MSNBC spent a lot of time, money and design effort, in collaboration with the ‘great’ Magnum Photo agency, to put this together. But there is also no doubt, that this entire body of work, with all its fancy graphics, its large-scale photographic presentations, its sophisticated digital presentation structure, is entirely meant to do three things:

– Create the impression that a flood of zombie-like brown skin ‘refugees’ are flocking to our clean, White shores for reasons that have nothing to do with our illegal wars, occupations and invasions, and consistent support for dictatorships (Israel, Jordan, Egypt, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Iraq for example)

– Create the impression that ‘Europe’ is under threat, and its ‘cultural’ values drowning and in danger of dilution from these ‘refugee’s who come from the ‘other world

– The pain and strain of the European / Western, as she grapples with her inner morality and humanity, and the economic pressures and demands of these ‘beggars’ and ‘usurpers’.

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A Toast To A Man To Remember

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Laughing From The Wrong Side

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It was a relief to finally read something that reminds us that comedy is not dissent. This piece by Sugarman echoes a critique I wrote some months ago – and for which I was summarily mocked, about John Oliver and his treatment of the issue of state surveillance of American citizens, and later, on his rather bizarre and right-wing interview of Snowden.

In the first piece I had argued that:

“Comedy denudes issues of urgency and the human will to act. It finds a way to make us laugh at torture, social deprivation, racism, war and murder. It makes acceptable what ought to be intolerable and seduced us into a place where we come to believe that describing and articulating something as a joke is an act. and it lets us feel that having laughed, we have somehow done and acted. for after all, we laughed st the fools and that sets us apart from them.

Comedy has become the anesthesia our capitalist societies are given so that we can accept the unacceptable. So that we can indulge in inaction while thinking we are acting. Comedy is the posture we adopt when critical thinking and critical engagement are lost.”

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Clueless Liberalism

France political and security responses are a good case study of how popular Islamophobia spreads in a nation. If the State acts in such a targeted, and sweeping fashion, and its spokes persons define so clearly and explicitly the ‘enemy’ they are going after, the citizenry can’t really be expected to remain immune from its constructions and framing of how to evaluate and judge a situation, and whom to blame for it. So when the state so publicly demonstrates its resolve, so to speak, and the ordinary, over-worked and under-engaged citizen watches all this, it isn’t all too surprising that the pathology spreads.

“Backed by the new powers, authorities have carried out about 3,400 raids on mosques, homes, and businesses with more than 300 people placed under house arrest.”

Of course, add to this the near daily media discourse and framing of wars in various countries where the construction of the ‘enemy’ is almost always on religious or cultural grounds, with all political and historical facts and legacies distorted and modified to create further evidence of ‘the enemies’ deviant and inhuman thought process and strategies.

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The Troubles With History

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Keep this paragraph in mind the next time you see a ‘great’ story about Honduras in National Geographic, or Time or The New York Times, because it will not be included in it:

“Instead of condemning the figures behind the uprising, suspending support to the illegitimate government of Zelaya’s successor, Roberto Micheletti, and demanding a restoration of the democratically elected Zelaya, Secretary Clinton decided to move on. In her memoir “Hard Choices,” Clinton wrote that after the coup, she went about hatching a plan with other leaders in the region “to restore order in Honduras and ensure that free and fair elections could be held quickly and legitimately, which would render the question of Zelaya moot.” The United States pushed for elections, and in November 2009, despite a boycott by opposition leaders and international observers, elections were orchestrated by the same figures behind Zelaya’s ouster.

Since the coup, violence and assassinations, as well as persecutions of journalists and social justice advocates, have skyrocketed in Honduras. Last week’s high-profile murder of the Goldman prize-winning indigenous leader and environmental activist Berta Caceres is yet another tragic example of the abhorrent human rights record in Honduras under the government that came to power via the 2009 coup. Between 2010 and 2014, 101 environmental activists have been killed in Honduras, according to Global Witness. Clinton’s camp has said that allegations about her role in the 2009 coup are “nonsense.”

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Eradicating Politics Or How Technology Can Help Keep Annoyances Away!

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How do you respond to an article that carries the seeds of its own negation? Blakemore is excited, but it seems the excitement comes from spending too much time with people with technology tools and a story to sell.

This entire article read like a promotional brochure because:

– the GPS mapping companies with a vested interest in promoting their projects and products are repeatedly mentioned in the article.

– the owners / employees of those companies are the only voices we get to hear.

– the technology is placed at center stage, manufacturing that most perfect of TED-elusions i.e that technology overcomes politics, policies, interests, governance, history and the agency of people itself.

This latter point is critical: what the article veils is the ordinary and lets-get-our-hands-dirty work that people who need to confront the local government, demand action and change, and improve their lives, still have to do. the GIS products mentioned here actually only enable them to do this better, but they do not create their ability to do it at all. In fact, that the local communities are in fact engaged in demanding rights and services from the city, state and federal governments is nothing new, and in fact, had the writer bothered to look carefully, one of the most obvious things that she would have seen in such deprived and marginalised areas. there are dozens of groups and community activists fighting to improve conditions, and to push back an exploitative and indifferent city government. this is true across slums around the globe. Details »

The End Of The ’60s

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“Let us remember that Zionism and anti-Zionism have been part of Jewish life for more than a century, that debates about Zionism have broken up many a Jewish dinner table and constituted a matter of ongoing dispute within the Jewish community. Jewish internationalists, communists, and those who favor binational or federated forms of government for Israel and Palestine, and many orthodox Jews have openly opposed some version of Zionism – do we no longer count that as part of Jewish history? Even the respected Israeli newspaper, Ha’aretz, sponsors debates for and against Zionism. What grounds, then, do we have for censoring such debates on the UC campus? Our mission at the university is to consider all points of view and make informed decisions and grounded judgments on the basis of what we hear and read. We do not censor viewpoints from the start. That leaves us ignorant and ill-equipped to interpret our complex world. Rather than produce an instrument for censorship and limit the activities of students, staff, and faculty, ban meetings and debates, and demean scholarship that represents a range of views about Palestine and Israel, we should instead be safeguarding this most important task of the university as one of the few places where conflictual issues such as these can be articulated, debated, and understood over time. Let us not betray this most important public task of the university.”

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