The Law As A Weapon Of War

A key tool / weapon in the use of mass and collective violence of so-called ‘tribal’ societies of Pakistan is the prejudiced presumption that these are ‘lawless’ communities, or communities that have ‘traditional law’ or even no ‘rule of law’. Few have examined the idea of ‘rule of law’, and the use of this convention to oppress and dominate those who have something that does not look like what is basically a bizarre belief that only anglo-american ideas of law are valid descriptions of ‘rule of law’.

As Ugo Mattei, in his essay ”Emergency based predatory capitalism'(see the book: “contemporary states of emergency”, edited by Didier Fassin / Mariella Pandolfi) , points out.

“It is worth repeating that whatever sense of the term (rule of law) we choose, the meaning of ‘the rule of law’ finds its roots in the deepest self-conscious of Western civilisation. It is certainly remote from non-Western political experiences. The ‘Orientalism’ that altogether dominates Western political discourse feeds on the perception of the ‘other’ (the non-Western) as lacking ‘the rule of law’ and therefore lacking ‘law’ itself, and consequently the basis of human rights. This discourse rejects the idea that the legal profession is just one of the ways in which conflicts can be governed in complex society. It perhaps may be a ‘better’ technical instrument, but certainly is not a more legitimate one from a democratic perspective, since jurists lack democratic legitimacy. From this perspective, the narrative around the legal history of people considered ‘without history’ is false beyond all limits.”

Ruskola’s has a fascinating book called “Legal Orientalism” which examines the impact of these legal prejudices on China.

9780674073067-lgSee a short video about this work here.

But we have a similar pattern in Pakistan, where a ridiculously disconnected legal apparatus, discourse, and ethic, infects the entire Pakistani legal system. To say nothing of the repeated use of ‘the rule of law’ as a means to discard and dismiss entire communities and societies existing legal and civic practices and imposing upon them the band-aid and paper glue Pakistani legal system, complete with its hideous colonial continuities, prejudices, arrogances and violence.

Legal scholar Obaid Siddique’s new book ‘Pakistan’s Experience With Formal Law: An Alien Experience’, captures one aspect of this situation.

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However, I am particularly intrigued by the ease with which so-called ‘tribal’ communities – a label that is not only a legacy of colonial arrogance and justification for murderous pacification i.e mass slaughter, have repeatedly been the victims of the state’s attempts at ‘civilising missions’, all performed from the safety of draconian authoritarian legal structures that kill first and ask questions later. And despite this decades of violence, despite this complete evisceration of non-Western legal practices and codes in these communities, we are told that it is ‘they’ who have no law, and it is they who are barbaric and lawless. A recent example of the sickening racism and ignorant judgement – a judgement that condemns the so-called ‘tribal’ people to mass murder and brutality, was offered by the deviant and ridiculous Dawn columnist Irfan Husain, where he declared – in absolutely and complete contradiction of known and documented history and facts – that:

WHAT do Afghanistan, Somalia, Saudi Arabia, Mali, northern Nigeria, Pakistan’s tribal areas and Yemen have in common?

They all have Muslim populations, are socially backward, mistreat women, and have a profound distrust of reason and modern education. Above all, they are tribal societies that use Islam to rationalise and uphold archaic tribal values and laws.

Unsurprisingly, most of them are caught up in violent conflicts fuelled in equal parts by tribal loyalties, faith and ignorance. Shia-Sunni rivalry is one fault line dividing the Muslim world. The second one is the tension between those aspiring to democracy, and the autocrats who oppress and misrule them.

The buzz words run wild. Democracy. Mistreatment of Women. And of course: Archaic Tribal Values And Laws. Now lets kill them.

The rule of law. A series of laws and legal arrangements designed to protect the interests of the powerful, and in particular, the propertied. The rule of law – always imposed on those from whom we are stealing at will, and killing with ease. The rule of law – a pretext to violate the sanctity of human life, and remove any and all attempts at social, economic and political equality and power. It is time for us to examine what this ‘rule of law’ is, and how it actually manifests itself in the lives of the people in Pakistan. We will find quite the ugly truth.

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From “Headmen” To “Hitmen”–A People Brutalised Yet Again

Another photographer turns up at another manufactured ‘traditional’ geography, and produces another set of racist, reductive and entirely fake set of images. I don’t mean ‘fake’ in the way that most photographer’s get all concerned about. I mean ‘fake’ in a much more serious way, one that reduces people to social, political and historical caricatures and makes them into concocted objects for class titillation and voyeurism. And this American magazine–mired deep in the heart of American imperialism, its violence and its brutality–publishes the images and accompanies them with what can only be described as one of the most incredibly ahistorical, obfuscatory and infantile articles I have read outside of stuff frequently published by Time Magazine and/or The New York Times.

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Thomas Sankara’s Restless Children

The project is now complete. Although, we may never really complete the telling of this remarkable story. You can see the project by clicking on this link here, or on the image below.


Eyes Of Aliyah–Deport, Deprive, Extradite Initiative By Nisha Kapoor

I have publicly and on this forum very explicitly argued against the strange ‘disappearance’ of black/brown bodies that are the actual targets and victims of our ‘liberal’ state policies of surveillance, entrapment, drone assassinations, renditions and indefinite detention. I recently argued:

“Western visual journalism, and visual artists, have erased the actual victims of the criminal policies of the imperial state. Instead, most all have chosen to produce a large array of projects examining drone attacks, surveillance, detentions and other practices, through the use of digital abstractions, analogous environments, still life work or just simply the fascinating and enticing safety of datagrams and charts. Even a quick look at recent exhibitions focusing on the ‘war on terror’ or wars in general, have invited works that use digital representations of war, or focus on the technologies of war. An extreme case of this deflection are recent projects on drone warfare that not only avoid the actual brown/black bodies that are the targets of deadly drone attacks, but are not even produced anywhere near the geographies and social ecologies where drone attacks continue to happen! Yet, these works have found tremendous popularity, though i remain confused what kinds of conversations or debates they provoke given that the voices of the families of those who have been killed, are not only entirely missing, but people who can raised the difficult questions about the lies and propaganda that are used to justify the killings, are also entirely missing.”

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Public Release of “The Sinner”

This is my first feature length documentary film and we–Justice Project Pakistan, with the guiding support of Sarah BelalRimmel Mohydin and others at Justice Project Pakistan, are finally releasing it.

And we are doing it first in Pakistan.

The film takes us into the world of capital punishment in Pakistan through the life of one man; Jan Masi. Jan Masi worked as an execution for nearly 30 years, and claims to have executed over 1800 people. He started his work in the enthusiastic pursuit of revenge for the execution of Pakistan’s Prime Minister Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto.

This isn’t a typical documentary film. No talking heads. No linear story-telling. No polemics or moral grand standing. No righteous exclamations against capital punishment. Instead, Jan Masi, his life, his scars, his fears and despair, act as metaphors for the meaning of capital punishment in Pakistan, and the consequences it has on the broader Pakistani society.

Sudhir Patwardhan

Sudhir Patwardhan.

Can you discover ‘an influence’ after the fact?

What do you call someone who seems to embody your eye, your sensibility, and yet you had never seen his / her work, and yet, when you now see it, you see the ‘influence’…the similarities?

Is he confronting the same questions? Is he seeing this incredibly complex and multi-layered world with the same desire to depict it as close to that complexity as possible?

I was taken aback. The aesthetic pursuit is so familiar. It is as if he is a step ahead of me. He is a step ahead of me.

I am going through these images–gorgeous, striking, unique, and no, I refuse to give you some ‘European’ reference to understand them in any way. They are Patwardhan’s and his alone. But I want to make them as photographs.

They are the photographs I would make if in Mumbai. It is beautiful stuff. It makes me want to go and make photographs.

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Make It Right For Palestine, November 4, 2017

Be there. Hyde Park. Speaker’s Corner. London. 12:00 noon. 4th November, 2017.

The Polis Project…Is Up And Running

If you can’t join them, then just do it on your own.

We launched a new collective focused on research, reportage and resistance. The specific goals and objectives are being developed as we speak, but the idea is a simple one: to collect under one banner a group of individuals from different fields – artists, writers, academics, photographers, intellectuals, poets and others, who are consistently working against the grain. In this time of collective conformity, and a media sycophancy to power and extremism, some of us felt the need to create a small space where people are still determined to refuse the agendas of political power, debilitating capitalism, nationalist extremism and neoliberal idiocy, and remain fools in their hearts, and idealists in their souls.

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Short Doc: “As If A Nightmare”;The Story Of Former Bagram Prisoner Abdul Haleem Saifullah

 

We are commemorating 9/11 this week, but by remembering the ‘other’ victims of that event that few chose to remember. These are the brown bodies that rarely make it into visual media projects, that since 9/11, have chosen to hide behind digital representations, data charts, and other visual forms that do a lot, but never permit us to see or hear the brown and black people who actually suffer the consequences of drone attacks, sweeping surveillance, targeted entrapment, renditions, indefinite detentions, torture and other forms of inhumanity that today liberal minds seem to be able to easily justify.

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Short Doc: “Prisoner 1432” – The Story of Former Bagram Prisoner Amanatullah Ali

 

We are commemorating 9/11 this week, but by remembering the ‘other’ victims of that event that few chose to remember. These are the brown bodies that rarely make it into visual media projects, that since 9/11, have chosen to hide behind digital representations, data charts, and other visual forms that do a lot, but never permit us to see or hear the brown and black people who actually suffer the consequences of drone attacks, sweeping surveillance, targeted entrapment, renditions, indefinite detentions, torture and other forms of inhumanity that today liberal minds seem to be able to easily justify.

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10 Things To Consider…

I recommend that photographers, photojournalists, documentary photographers remember these wise words by Tania Canas, RISE Arts Director / Member – I am copying and pasting it here. As brown and black bodies are stripped of their clothing, as brown and black children are dehumanised to mere misery, as brown and black women are reduced to simply victims, as ghettos and brothels and refugee camps and slums become the ‘paint by number’ formula for White photographer’s career and publishing success, it becomes increasingly important that those of us on the receiving end of White ‘largesse’ begin to build obstacles, speak back, and refuse / reject these ‘representations’ and their reductive, violent and brutal narrative frames. We have lost too much, and are in danger of whatever little we have left as humans and as histories, if we permit this process to continue.

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