Reading White Feminism: A Most Masculine State by Madawi al-Rasheed

Selections from recent readings against Western feminism – in particular, its racist and Orientalist origins and its continuing centrality in Western liberal imperial practices and discourse.

A Most Masculine State: Gender, Politics, and Religion in Saudi Arabia

Reading White Feminism: “Sexual Decoys” by Zillah Eisenstein

Selections from recent readings against Western feminism – in particular, its racist and Orientalist origins and its continuing centrality in Western liberal imperial practices and discourse.

Sexual Decoys: Gender, Race and War in an Imperial Democracy by Zillah Eisenstein

Reading White Feminism: “White Women’s Righs” by Louise Newman

Selections from recent readings against Western feminism –  in particular, its racist and Orientalist origins and its continuing centrality in Western liberal imperial practices and discourse.

White Women’s Rights: The Racial Origins of Feminism in the United States – Louise Michelle Newman

Dubai – a rework

a room of my own. #dubai #uae #metaphorsareboring #cynicalcelebration

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Musings & Confusions: 8th Feb. 2017

Still love reading these amazing stories…Carlos Saavedra’s work…

…and Mashruk Ahmed’s 

I Lie…

via PressSync

More men like…

This Post Is Not About The Burkini

Moustafa Bayoumi had an interesting Facebook post this morning that speaks to the histories of colonialism that may inform the recent French idiocies around the uses of the burkini at French beaches. The post is here:

I found it provocative and decided to engage with him figuratively. That I am currently designing some photo projects for 2017 that look at the continuing ‘rot’ of colonial and imperial rule and the ways it scars and distorts life, ecology and economy, his arguments were very interesting. However, though Bayoumi makes some good points, but I can’t help but feel that he overstates his case, perhaps even over determines it, by suggesting a rather idealized idea of ‘direct’ vs’ indirect’ colonial rule. This idea does not stand the test of history in any way.

So here is why. Details »

Helping Us Absorb The Shock Of Reality

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Raymond Williams work ‘Keywords’ is perhaps one of the great pioneering cultural studies text of our lifetime. There are not many works that can claim that. In it, Williams pointed out that the meaning and use of words is deeply influenced by and changes with our political, social and economic situations and needs. As Williams himself argued in the book:

“…[T]he air of massive impersonality which the Oxford Dictionary communicates is not so impersonal, so purely scholarly, or so free of active social and political values as might be supposed from its occasional use.”

Words matter. And how, when and who uses them matters profoundly. When it is a word used by Western media, one deeply implicated in upholding corporate, political and military interests, we should always keep Williams insight in mind. Hence, it is irresponsible, if not disingenuous, of any writing by a media critic or commentator when writing about the American / Western media (broadcast, print, digital, radio) to not acknowledge the existence of this political and corporate influence, and the ways in which it influences so much of what is shown and spoken about. It is also disingenuous not to acknowledged that using and manipulating the media today is a crucial goal of any political administration anywhere in the world. The reach and access of media is greater today than ever before, and its influence on opinions and ideas second only to the Church. Perhaps more so, but I do not wish to blaspheme. Hence, I am repeatedly dismayed at the persistent and consistent eraser by media critics and analysts of American and European journalism’s close relationship to political and corporate power. (Le Monde Diplomatique is an exception, reporting repeatedly on this close collaboration when it comes to French media.) So much has been written about this to be self-evident, but it is intentionally pushed aside in discussions about how news get produced, published, disseminated and discussed. From corporate and private ownership of major newspapers, to political influence and collusion with journalists and editors, we know well today how closely our media has become a propaganda machine.

So when I came across this essay titled “Should News Outlets Show Photographs of Terrorists?” by Fred Ritchen – a former photo editor at The New York Times and now a teacher at the International Center for Photography in New York, I was left confused by many of its positions. Details »

The Panic Of The State Or Finding ‘Terrorists’ Everywhere It Looks!

supports of mehr abdul sattar foot, a landless peasant running for a punjab provincial assembly seat, drive through local villages prior to the february 18th elections

supports of mehr abdul sattar foot, a landless peasant running for a punjab provincial assembly seat, drive through local villages prior to the february 18th elections

This is what our terror laws and terror courts are mostly used for – to repress the weak, to silence the poor, to destroy a genuine struggle of a people for equality and for rights in the country. Details »

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